2010 GMC Terrain Review by Kelsey Mays

It should come as little surprise that the new GMC Terrain, a corporate twin to the redesigned Chevrolet Equinox, retains most of its sibling's strengths and weaknesses. The wild card — or, more appropriately, the elephant in the design studio — is the Terrain's styling. If it works for you, the Terrain is every bit as competitive as the Equinox. One caveat, however: Unless you need the towing capacity, avoid the V-6. The Terrain shows its best colors in four-cylinder form.

In ascending order, trim levels include the SLE1, SLE2, SLT1 and SLT2. All four come standard with the four-cylinder engine and front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is optional on any trim, and the V-6 is optional on all but the SLE1. On each trim, you get a little added content if you choose the GMC version versus the Chevy, which accounts for the Terrain's higher price. I drove a front-wheel-drive V-6 SLT1, though I've driven both engines in the mechanically identical Equinox, which you can compare to the Terrain here.

See also:

Towing the Vehicle From the Rear
Notice: Towing the vehicle from the rear could damage it. Also, repairs would not be covered by the vehicle warranty. Never have the vehicle towed from the rear. Do not tow the vehicle from the r ...

Power Outlets
The vehicle has 12-volt outlets that can be used to plug in electrical equipment, such as a cell phone or MP3 player. The power outlets are located on the instrument panel below the climate controls, ...

Infotainment Control Buttons
The buttons on the faceplate are used to start primary functions while using the infotainment system. VOL/ (Volume/Power): 1. Press to turn the system on and off. 2. Turn to adjust the volume. ...