Noise, Ride & Handling

A defining attribute of GM's latest crossovers is improved noise insulation. Road and wind noise are hushed, leaving the cabin exceptionally quiet — at least until you hit a bump. The suspension isn't a particularly quiet one — it responds to potholes and expansion joints with loud, echoing noises — and, as we noted in the Equinox review, some may find the ride too firm overall.

The steering wheel turns with light effort at low speeds; it firms up progressively as you reach highway speeds, but I still found it a bit loose at 70 mph. Take an off-ramp quickly, and the Terrain has carlike resistance to body roll. Unfortunately, patches of rough pavement belie any cornering confidence: Steering response becomes sloppy, giving the Terrain a floaty sensation of being disconnected from the road. It reminds me more of traditional truck-based SUVs than car-based crossovers, to which the Terrain and its Chevy cohort belong.

    See also:

    Cold Check Procedure
    Use this procedure only as a reference to determine if the transmission has enough fluid to be operated safely until a hot check procedure can be made. The hot check procedure is the most accurate met ...

    Gasoline Specifications (U.S. and Canada Only)
    At a minimum, gasoline should meet ASTM specification D 4814 in the United States or CAN/CGSB-3.5 or 3.511 in Canada. Some gasolines contain an octane-enhancing additive called methylcyclopentadienyl ...

    How to Check Automatic Transmission Fluid
    Because this operation can be a little difficult, it may be best to have this done at the dealer service department. If not taken to the dealer, be sure to follow all the instructions here or a false ...