2010 GMC Terrain Review by Kelsey Mays

It should come as little surprise that the new GMC Terrain, a corporate twin to the redesigned Chevrolet Equinox, retains most of its sibling's strengths and weaknesses. The wild card — or, more appropriately, the elephant in the design studio — is the Terrain's styling. If it works for you, the Terrain is every bit as competitive as the Equinox. One caveat, however: Unless you need the towing capacity, avoid the V-6. The Terrain shows its best colors in four-cylinder form.

In ascending order, trim levels include the SLE1, SLE2, SLT1 and SLT2. All four come standard with the four-cylinder engine and front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is optional on any trim, and the V-6 is optional on all but the SLE1. On each trim, you get a little added content if you choose the GMC version versus the Chevy, which accounts for the Terrain's higher price. I drove a front-wheel-drive V-6 SLT1, though I've driven both engines in the mechanically identical Equinox, which you can compare to the Terrain here.

See also:

Securing a Child Restraint Designed for the LATCH System
WARNING If a LATCH-type child restraint is not attached to anchors, the child restraint will not be able to protect the child correctly. In a crash, the child could be seriously injured or killed. In ...

Auxiliary Taillamp
To replace one of these lamps: 1. Open the liftgate. See Liftgate on page 2‑9. 2. Remove the interior trim access panel. A. Attachment Nuts B. Retaining Hook 3. Remove the five attachment ...

Replacing Safety Belt System Parts after a Crash
WARNING A crash can damage the safety belt system in the vehicle. A damaged safety belt system may not properly protect the person using it, resulting in serious injury or even death in a crash. To ...