How Does an Airbag Restrain?

In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions, even belted occupants can contact the steering wheel or the instrument panel. In moderate to severe side collisions, even belted occupants can contact the inside of the vehicle.

Airbags supplement the protection provided by safety belts by distributing the force of the impact more evenly over the occupant's body.

Rollover capable roof-rail airbags are designed to help contain the head and chest of occupants in the outboard seating positions in the first, second and third rows.

The rollover capable roof-rail airbags are designed to help reduce the risk of full or partial ejection in rollover events, although no system can prevent all such ejections.

But airbags would not help in many types of collisions, primarily because the occupant's motion is not toward those airbags. See When Should an Airbag Inflate? on page 3‑27 for more information.

Airbags should never be regarded as anything more than a supplement to safety belts.

    See also:

    Compass Zone
    The zone is set to zone eight upon leaving the factory. Your dealer will set the correct zone for your location. Under certain circumstances, such as during a long distance cross-country trip or movi ...

    Adding Equipment to the Airbag-Equipped Vehicle
    Adding accessories that change the vehicle's frame, bumper system, height, front end, or side sheet metal may keep the airbag system from working properly. The operation of the airbag system can also ...

    Recovery Hooks
    WARNING Never pull on recovery hooks from the side. The hooks could break and you and others could be injured. When using recovery hooks, always pull the vehicle straight out. Notice: Never use re ...