Weight of the Trailer Tongue

The tongue load (A) of any trailer is very important because it is also part of the vehicle weight. The Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) includes the curb weight of the vehicle, any cargo carried in it, and the people who will be riding in the vehicle as well as trailer tongue weight. Vehicle options, equipment, passengers and cargo in the vehicle reduce the amount of tongue weight the vehicle can carry, which will also reduce the trailer weight the vehicle can tow. See “ Vehicle Load Limits” for more information about the vehicle's maximum load capacity.

Trailer tongue weight (A) should be 10 to 15 percent and fifth-wheel or gooseneck kingpin weight should be 15 to 25 percent of the loaded trailer weight up to the maximums for vehicle series and hitch type.

Trailer tongue weight (A) should be 10 to 15 percent and fifth-wheel or gooseneck kingpin weight should be 15 to 25 percent of the loaded trailer weight up to the maximums for vehicle series and hitch type.

Do not exceed the maximum allowable tongue weight for the vehicle. Choose the shortest hitch extension that will position the hitch ball closest to the vehicle. This will help reduce the effect of trailer tongue weight on the rear axle.

Do not exceed the maximum allowable tongue weight for the vehicle. Choose the shortest hitch extension that will position the hitch ball closest to the vehicle. This will help reduce the effect of trailer tongue weight on the rear axle.

Trailering may be limited by the vehicle's ability to carry tongue weight. Tongue or kingpin weight cannot cause the vehicle to exceed the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) or the RGAWR(Rear Gross Axle Weight Rating). See “Total Weight on the Vehicle's Tires” later in this section for more information.

After loading the trailer, weigh the trailer and then the tongue, separately, to see if the weights are proper. If they are not, adjustments might be made by moving some items around in the trailer.

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